Category: Geometry

Buy, buy, buy and ship (8 ideas)

Here comes Black Friday, Small business Saturday, Cyber Monday and Giving Tuesday.  It’s a crazy time of year.  Use all of that shopping to educate your students about good deals and how shoppers can be fooled. Is this really 70%…

Thanksgiving, shopping, football and giving

How should I cook my turkey? – Students judge timing, cost, tastiness, and quantity necessary as they plan for the feast. 4.MD.1, 5.NBT.7, 4.MD2, 6.RP.3, 6.NS.3, 7.NS.3  Great video on a deep frying fire with William Shatner. Shopping season already! – Students will…

Lots of Cranberries

In this activity, students learn about how cranberries are grown and harvested; estimate their size and quantities; and see what they can deduce from published statistics.

Total lunar eclipse

On the morning of November 8, 2022, many of us will be able to see the last full lunar eclipse until March 2025. Luckily, many of us will be able to see the eclipse pretty close to when we would…

Halloween activities

14 Activities How well can you predict your candy haul? – Students consider how to determine their best predictions of their candy haul.  The math ideas of measurement error and percent error are introduced.  Students then predict their own Halloween…

The size of chocolates

In time for Halloween, students assume that all of our pieces of chocolate are about the same thickness and proceed to approximate their volumes by comparing only their surface areas.  Encourage them to create overlapping grids and count the fully and partially-covered cells or use the mean radius method.

Indigenous Peoples or Columbus Day

Sts learn a little history, question what they have learned earlier, and calculate how far off Columbus was from East India and his understanding of the actual circumference of the Earth.

Hexadecimal coloring

Probably most of us have heard of and even used hexadecimal color codes. Don’t you wonder why their number descriptions really make sense? In this activity we first ask students to color in our Golden Spiral by giving them the…

How much pee is in this pool?

A Canadian chemist, Xing-Fang Li, has found a marker for urine that chlorine doesn’t disguise. In this activity, students calculate volume of several pools, change that cubic foot volume to gallons of pool water, and try to approximate how much urine is in each pool.

Where should I drop my puck

Act 1 – Give students time to view the game board above or give them our one-page activity. The above picture is larger when you click on it. Ask students for their gut reaction about which slot would give them…

4th of July

Hot dog eating; Flag art; Fireworks on your calculator; Creating a 5-pointed star with one cut; and a possible new, 52-star flag.