Tag: HS

What can you tell about a snowflake?

As a snowflake falls from the sky, its crystal grows according to the humidity and temperatures of the air that it passes through. In this activity, students interpret a graphic that clarifies that growth and try to deduce what conditions…

Wrapping presents on the diagonal

In this activity students determine if this method for minimizing wrapping paper is actually more efficient then the traditional method. For a hands on learning experiment, have students actually wrap a small rectangular prism using any available paper in both the traditional and diagonal methods. Then let them compare the two quantities of wrapping paper and decide which method uses less paper and by what percent.

Wind chill

Students use the National Weather System chart to gauge wind chill, examine the patterns that correlate increasing wind and/or decreasing temperatures, use wind chill numbers to estimate possible wind and temperature factors, and generally become familiar with this sort of interpolation and calculation. There’s a great high school extention that uses fractional exponents and logs to solve.

Hanukkah is almost here!

Egad, Hanukkah begins this year on Sunday evening, November 28th. I think it was in December last year. Why isn’t it always on the same date? Students look at the Hebrew calendar and appreciate the incredible mathematics involved in creating a…

Veterans Day 2021

Here are two very different maps about where Veterans live in the U.S. and which states have the largest density of Veterans citizens. What do these two maps make you wonder or realize? How can you explain their comparison?

What if I got more people to rake my leaves?

In this activity students see the inverse relationship between number of workers and time to complete the whole job. They graph hyperbolas and consider how long the extreme condition of zero people raking might take to complete the job.  

End of Daylight Savings time confusion

In this activity students try to figure out how time settings will change as they move from place to place and what variables are involved in the daylight savings time shift. Day length? Latitude?

Halloween activities – 13 activities

How well can you predict your candy haul? – Students consider how to determine their best predictions of their candy haul.  The math ideas of measurement error and percent error are introduced.  Students then predict their own Halloween candy collection…

Collecting the most candy

Use your student’s Halloween enthusiasm to do a study on volumes.  We’ve created an activity that asks students to calculate the volume of candy containers that are silly and intriguing.  Skip the cone and the sphere to make this activity…

I should have invested!

Students use yearly percent increase data to decide which stock: Apple, Disney or Amazon, they should have invested in way back in 2015.
What was the net gain of these stocks?
How do you figure that?
Does the arithmetic or geometric average of those increases equal their total gain or loss over the years?

Federal debt and deficit – What are they?

national debt What’s the big deal with our national debt?  Do we actually borrow money to cover our debt?  If we do, imagine the interest charges? Help your students (and their families) understand the meaning and repercussions of too much…

Indigenous Peoples or Columbus Day

*** Two activities *** When Columbus landed in Guanahani (renamed San Salvador, Bahama Islands by Columbus), he began the European settlement of the New World. Guanahani was inhabited by the Taíno people and it wasn’t really a new world. In this…