4th of July

5 possible activities!

Nathan's Hot Dog eating contest - updated! - What do you wonder about this event?  What questions do you have from looking at the historical data? How have the records changed?  Why do you think that is so? How many hot dogs can a human possibly eat in 10 minutes? 6.RP, 7.RP, 7.EE, HSS/ID, HSN, HSA, HSF, MP1, MP2. MP3

Flag Art -  In this activity students measure; create whole number ratios for the official U.S. flag; decide how our artistic flags might be different from the official flag; make stars from regular pentagons, and finally create a flag design in honor of the Fourth of July. 4.NBT, 4.NFB, 5.NBT, 5.NF.B, 6.RP.1, 6.RP.2, 6.RP.3, 7.RP.1, 7.RP.2, 7.G.1

Fireworks on your calculator - Let your students experiment with their graphing calculators to create a nice fireworks display?  We've written a brief activity that questions students about manipulating parabolas, adjusting their calculator windows, and helping them celebrate whatever. Or consider using Desmos or Geogebra to create these fireworks. Enjoy! HSA.SSE, HSF.IF

Betsy Ross's 5-pointed star - The rough design of the flag was drawn by a committee of George Washington, Robert Morris, and George Ross in 1776.  When approached by the committee, George Ross's niece, a respected seamstress, Betsy Ross, suggested some important changes.  One change was to use a 5-pointed star to represent each of the 13 colonies. The committee objected that a pentagram would be too hard to make. Betsy demonstrated that she could create the desired star by simply folding fabric and making just one scissors cut.  So, the design was changed.  How did she do that fold and cut? 7.G.B, 8.G, HSG.CO

Will our flag change yet again? - U.S. Congress is again considering whether to grant statehood to Washington D. C. and Puerto Rico.  Our activity is about the possible designs of a new 52-state flag.  3.OA, 4.OA

Mallie’s latest Big Burger

Click on this image to see it larger in a new window.

It's time to treat your students to ratios, proportions, fractions and BIG BURGERS! In this activity students explore the ratio of the various ingredients in the world's largest burger (pictured above & in the video below).

Students learn about the initial weight of the giant meat patty and calculate the final weight of the patty after it is cooked.  They decide what percent lean this meat must have been and consider how long it would take their family to eat the entire world-record burger.

At last, its summer again

How much pee is in this pool? - A Canadian chemist, Xing-Fang Li, has found a marker for urine that chlorine doesn't disguise. In this activity, students calculate volume of several pools, change that cubic foot volume to gallons of pool water, and try to approximate how much urine is in each pool. 4.MD.C, 5.MD, 6.G.A, 6.RP.A, 7.RP.A, 7.G.B


How much water do you have to drink? - In this activity student develop formulas for calculating their water needs, learn about the effects of too little water, and calculate what they should be consuming. 4.OA.B, 5.OA.B, 6.NS.B, 6.RP.A, 8.F.A, HSF.BF, HSA.CED, HSM

Drinks at the Fair - At the amusement park, our friend, Jason, was intrigued with this sign for drink deals. He and his family come often to the park and, during the summer when it is hot, naturally drink a lot. Which is the best deal for them? 7.NS.3, 7.EE.3, 7.EE.4, 8.F.2, 8.F.5, HSA.CED.A.2, HSA.REI.D, HSA.REI.C.6, MP1, MP4

Father’s Day, Juneteenth, and The Longest Day (summer solstice)

We have some ideas for mathematics that honor fathers on Father's Day.

  • Thank you Mother and Father for all of those diapers - Students compare the cost of buying disposable versus cloth diapers. They estimate how much they cost their parents in diapers and consider how much they will spend on diapers when they have a baby. There is quite a bit of scaffolding built into the activity for students who might have limited experience with linear relationships and equation writing. 6.EE.9, 7.EE.4, 8.F.2, 8.F.4, 8.EE.8, HS.F-IF.8.B, HS.F-LE.2, HS.F-LE.5, MP7, MP8

  • Blueberry Muffin Suprise - This Sunday is Father’s Day. I looked up a recipe for something that I’m sure that my dad will love and I’m going to surprise him. I’m going to make blueberry muffins.
    This is a short activity that asks students to change the amounts in a blueberry muffin recipe to multiples of and fractions of a ¼ cup measuring cup (multiplication and division with unit fractions) 4.NF.4, 5.NF.7, 6.NS.1, 7.NS.2


  • Juneteenth - You can appreciate why this is such an important celebration when you look at the painful stages and some of the events and dates as America moved towards abolishing slavery. In this activity students read about the various ways freedom was promised in America until finally, freedom was gained ... July 19, 1865.

How old are you?

confusedWe usually give our ages in years, but that isn't very precise is it?  In this activity students find their age in days, hours and minutes.  First students take two minutes to estimate their age in days, hours and minutes.  When they make their estimates, consider sharing and recording estimates as a class.  Even though students will slightly vary in age, their estimates should be in the same relative range.

This is a great opportunity to discuss estimation and reasonability.  Follow this estimation & discussion with actual calculations.  Students can use any method that makes sense to them.  Depending on grade level,