Candy deals

$14.74

$6.99

$13.69

$9.94

$15.99


Clicking on any of the above images will open the image larger in a new window.

We found big mixed bags of candy at really good prices ... we think.

Students are asked to decide which would be the best deal and the worst deal on candy.  They can also create their own mixed bags.  This activity has unit pricing, philosophy of candy collecting, and Excel if you would like to use technology.  

Is the Electoral College unfair?

Show your students this really cute segment comparing how the Electoral College functions in our elections to what students think is fair and just. From the New York Times, Electoral College 101.

After showing the video consider asking your students what the grouping of students must have been for "colored pencils" to win the class electoral college?  Is there more than one possibility?  What is the minimum number of students that could have voted for colored pencils for them to still win the Electoral College.  Students then consider scenarios where a candidate wins the popular vote, but loses the Electoral College.  

Costume spending 2020

Dudley as SuperDog

Every year Americans spend a lot on Halloween and Halloween costumes. In this year of Covid restrictions, the numbers of people going to Halloween parties or trick-or-treating has gone down.  But people are still celebrating the holiday.

Use our current data on Halloween spending in America to engage your students in an analysis of the ratios and percents of population, participation, and money spent in honor of October 31st.  This activity takes kids through finding parts of wholes as well as ratio, percents and proportion problems.  Beware: the tasks in this activity involve some large numbers as well as some challenging fraction/ratio/proportion problems.

Electoral College vs. the popular vote


Click the map to create your own at 270toWin.com
Let your students see how votes really count with our activity on the Electoral College.  Can someone win the popular vote in the Presidential election and still not become President of the United States?

Monster cake

Jodie Berman, a high school math teacher in Chicago, loves mathematics and loves to cook.  We've created an activity based on her Monster Cake (composed of everything that Cookie Monster loves). This recipe is published in her blog, Binomial Baker,

First, students need to find the surface area that the M&Ms cover in order to approximate how many M&Ms she needs to finish her cake.

When Brian tried to make the cake, he mistakenly added too much peanut butter.  Now all the of ingredients will need to be increased by some percent to insure that the cake maintains appropriate ingredient ratios?  Do the math!

How much chocolate is left?

In this short activity, students reason and calculate what is left of these chocolate bars.  The bars are the same size but are molded into different number of sections.  Which one has the most left-over chocolate? How can you tell?