67 search results for ""7.G""

Giant iceberg

…and. JODY MARTIN / REUTERS Over the past Easter weekend this giant iceberg drifted passed Ferryland, Newfoundland. Its hard to tell how large it actually is but it looks huge. Use some of the data that was supplied and your estimation skills to gauge the volume of this iceberg. But wait! 90% of the berg is underwater and doesn’t show in this picture. How huge is this iceberg really? The activity: IcebergAlley.pdf CCSS: 5.MD.5, 6.G.2, 6.RP.3, 7.G.1, 7.G.5, HSG.MG.A.1, MP5 For members we have an… 0, 5

Do I have enough wrapping paper?

…below) Students can then work towards determining if one sheet will completely wrap the box. Take the opportunity to share student ideas and reasoning. As an extension we ask students to consider what the smallest sized piece of paper is that can be used to wrap this box and if they can devise a way to know, in general, if the wrapping paper is going to be sufficient for a certain sized box. The activity: EnoughPaper.pdf Useful information: Useful-info.pdf CCSS: 6.G.1, 6.G.4, 7.G.6,… 0, 4

Chocolate heart-shaped raspberry cake

…volume increase is not linear. Volume expansion would be cubed if all dimensions of the cake were enlarged but in this case (since we didn’t increase cake depth) only two dimensions are enlarged. The activity: Chocolate-RaspberryHeartCake.pdf CCSS: 7.G.B.4, 7.G.B.6, 7.RP.A, 7.EE.B, 8.G.C.9, HSG.GMD.A.3, HSG.MG.A.1, HSN.Q.A, HSA.CED.A.1 For members we have an editable Word docx, our Excel computations, and solutions: ChocolateRaspberryHeartCake.docx HeartCake.xlsx cake-solution.pdf For more… 0, 7

MAVEN arrives at Mars

…w does someone figure out how to do that? In this activity students examine the velocity required to stay in orbit and the velocity required to reach a different planet’s orbit. If you would like to begin this activity with more research on orbit try our previous post Why does it stay in orbit? The activity: MAVEN.pdf For members we have an editable Word docx and solutions. MAVEN.docx MAVEN-solution.pdf CCSS: 5.NBT.B.7, 6.RP.A, 7.EE,B.3, 7.G.B.4, 7.NS, 7.RP.A, 8.EE, HSG.GMD.A.1, HSS.ID.C Check… 0, 6

How Many Donuts is That?

…ons you are having in class. What might come up? different areas or arrays, scale, estimation, volume and in particular volume by multiplying the base area by the number of layers. CCSS: 4.MD.3, 4.NBT.5, 4.OA.3, 5.MD.3, 5.MD.5, 6.G.1, 6.G.2, 6.RP.3, 7.G.1, 7.G.6, MP1, MP2, MP3, MP6, MP7 ExtraInfo.pdf Act Three: This news clip gives the solution. Sequel: Now that you know how many donuts are in the box, what dimensions and number of rows and columns could give this exact number of donuts?… 0, 6

Activities for Super Bowl and Groundhog Day

…involves cutting a block of cheese, figuring how many servings, estimating how many times they need to multiply the recipe by to make enough pretzel bites, and multiplying and reducing fractions. 5.NF.3, 5.NF.6, 5.NF.7, 6.NS, 6.RP.1, 6.RP.2, 6.RP.3, 7.G, 7.NS Will Punxsutawney Phil see his shadow? – The relative frequency of the groundhog’s accurate forecasts. 7.SP.5, 7.SP.6, 7.SP.7 More Football activities Home Team Advantage – Students study the data from a graphic to verify whether there is… 0, 32

Chocolates and area

…method studnts use, consider having students report their thinking through a doc camera. Focus on student’s mathematical ideas and problem solving strategies. The concept of area as a measure of covering should be the theme of the sharing and class discussion. You may also consider using actual chocolates of different shapes and sizes as a class activity like two of my colleagues and friends did in their classrooms: CCSS: 3.MD.5 , 3.MD.6 , 6.G.1 , 7.G.4 , 7.G.6 Chocolate.pdf Chocolate-grid.pdf… 0, 5

Giant Snickers bar

…Wow! This snickers bar is huge! Act 1 – Big question = How many times bigger than a regular Snickers bar is this? What info would you like to know? How are you going to judge how much bigger this is … weight, dimensions, volume? This picture of the two Snickers bars together is courtesy of Jason Liebig from CollectingCandy.com. This is a regular Snickers with a Slice and Share. Act 2: Useful info: GiantSnickersInfo.pdf length of fun size Width of fun size… 0, 0

Chocolates

…method studnts use, consider having students report their thinking through a doc camera. Focus on student’s mathematical ideas and problem solving strategies. The concept of area as a measure of covering should be the theme of the sharing and class discussion. You may also consider using actual chocolates of different shapes and sizes as a class activity like two of my colleagues and friends did in their classrooms: CCSS: 3.MD.5 , 3.MD.6 , 6.G.1 , 7.G.4 , 7.G.6 Chocolate.pdf Chocolate-grid.pdf… 0, 5

How many times greater?

…that is probably too high. Act Two: What additional information would be useful here? (Clicking on any of these images will let you see them larger.) Act Three Solutions and teaching hints for members: CozyCoup-solution.pdf Sequel: The cozy coup manufacturers are making a giant cozy coupe that is roughly the same proportions as these cars. List possible dimensions of the giant cozy coupe. CCSS: 7.G.1, 7.G.6, 7.RP.3, HSG.MG.A.1, MP1, MP2, MP4… 0, 5

Making a ghost costume

…ivity young students can reason about the potential of a sheet, cut in a very defined circular shape, becoming a Halloween ghost costume. Notions of head diameter, sheet length, less than and greater than will all come into their reasoning. The activity: SheetGhost.pdf For members we have an editable Word docx and solutions. SheetGhost.docx SheetGhost-solution.pdf CCSS: 6.G.A.4, 7.G.A, 7.G.B… 0, 5

How many times bigger?

…that is probably too high. Act Two: What additional information would be useful here? (Clicking on any of these images will let you see them larger.) Act Three Solutions and teaching hints for members: CozyCoup-solution.pdf Sequel: The cozy coup manufacturers are making a giant cozy coupe that is roughly the same proportions as these cars. List possible dimensions of the giant cozy coupe. CCSS: 7.G.1, 7.G.6, 7.RP.3, HSG.MG.A.1, MP1, MP2, MP4… 0, 5

Saint Patrick’s Day, March 17th

…oing it again. In Chicago, the local plumbers union “dye” the Chicago River emerald green. Students learn what PPM (parts per million) means and attempt to figure out how much dye is used to sufficiently color the river. CCSS: 5.MD, 6.RP, 6.G, 7.RP, 7.G McDonald’s seasonally serves its Shamrock Shake for Saint Patrick’s Day. Add a little nutrition math to your celebration. In this post we look at calories, carbohydrates, sugars, fats, and proteins to decide what would be left for our day’s meal… 0, 5